CPS Curriculum

Crossfire Preparatory School

 

K4 – K5

 

CURRICULUM

 

K-4 (A Beka ) Curriculum: The K-4 program provides a portion of the regular K-5 program, so even four year olds learn to read at Crossfire Preparatory School (CPS).  Beginning with letters and sounds, students progress to reading words, sentences, and stories in their own reading books.

 

Children in the K-4 program will explore the following concepts. Children learn these concepts at their own pace. Children are taught with hands-on materials, songs, and games. They are assessed by observation and work samples.

 

Math

  • Numerals 1-10

  •  Counting objects to 100

  • One-to-one correspondence of objects

  • Sorting by various attributes: color, shape, size Patterns: AB, AABB, ABC

  • Sizes: small, medium, large

  • Shapes: square, rectangle, circle, triangle, oval, diamond, star, heart, octagon, hexagon

  • Matching: symbols, shapes, patterns, etc.

  • Same and Different

  • More, Less, Same

  • Time: Day and Night

  • Money: Explore through games, songs, and pretend play

LiteracyLiteracy

  • Exposure to alphabet: letter names and sounds

  • Recognize, spell, write first name

  • Hold a pencil, marker, crayon correctly

  • Retell familiar stories

  • Draw pictures and dictate sentences about stories and experiences

  • Answer questions about stories

  • Repeat simple nursery rhymes and finger play

  • Concepts of print: left to right direction, holding a book right-side-up

  • Build new vocabulary

  • Build listening skills

  • Strengthen visual discrimination

  • Sequencing

  • Develop fine motor skills: play dough, scissors, writing utensils, Legos, etc.

Science

  • Explore science tools: magnets, prisms, magnifying glasses, etc.

  • Experience the world through nature walks, gardening, and other explorations

  • Observe insect life

  • Observe plant growth Observe weather and plant life during each season

  • Measure and mix ingredients in cooking activities

  • Identify basic colors and explore color mixing

  • Make observational drawings and dictation

  • Explore the world with the five senses

  • Investigate animals, the homes they live in, the food they eat

Creative Arts

  • Explore a variety of art processes: painting, drawing, sculpture, weaving, collage, etc.

  • Use a variety of art materials: crayons, tempera paint, watercolor paint, colored pencils, markers, oil pastels, art chalk, clay

  • Experiment with mixing paint colors

  • Sing traditional songs and songs that enhance the curriculum

  • Participate in movement songs and dances

  • Use scarves, rhythm sticks, and bean bags to practice rhythms

  • Use a variety of children’s instruments Participate in dramatic play

  • Dramatize familiar stories

  • Act out the movements and sounds of animals

Social Skills

  • Practice problem-solving skills in social situations

  • Work in groups or with a partner on a variety of projects

  • Share classroom materials with the group

  • Practice using manners: please, thank you, excuse me, table manners

  • Communicate his/her needs

  • Take care of his/her own basic needs: clean up, roll up nap pad, fasten clothing, use tissue as needed, etc.

  • State personal information: first and last name, age, school name, city, state, country

  • Explore types of work and workers Explore modes of transportation

  • Participate in projects to help others in need: Neighbors in Need, Birthright, Operation: Rice Bowl, missions, etc.

Technology

  • Use computer programs to create picture stories

  • Use a computer mouse: click, click and drag

  • Use the Internet to explore kid-friendly websites

Character Education

Character Education will address skills and concepts that are important in growing up to be a good neighbor and citizen.

  • Responsibility

  • Respect

  • Fairness

  • Caring

  • Trustworthiness

  • Citizenship

 

Kindergarten (K-5) A Beka Curriculum:

 

CPS’s outstanding kindergarten phonetic reading program provides an excellent foundation for a life-long love of reading. Five-year-old students learn to recognize and write the letters of the alphabet along with their sounds, and will actually begin reading by December! They also develop writing and arithmetic skills, learning to count by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s to 100 and other arithmetic facts.

 

Kindergarten is an exciting time of exploration for your child. As his or her motor coordination increases, so too will his or her sense of independence, self-reliance, and self-confidence. As the year progresses, your child will be expected to complete assignments with less outside help, accept more responsibilities, and follow rules more closely.

 

Skills Required at the Beginning of Kindergarten

 

You may want to review this list and see if there is anything else you would like to teach your child before those first days of school.

  • Identify some letters of the alphabet

  • Grip a pencil, crayon, or marker correctly (with the thumb and fore finger supporting the tip)

  • Use scissors, glue, paint, and other art materials with relative ease

  • Write his first name using upper- and lowercase letters, if possible

  • Count to 10

  • Bounce a ball

  • Classify objects according to their size, shape, and quantity

  • Speak using complete sentences

  • Recognize some common sight words, like “stop”

  • Identify rhyming words

  • Repeat his full name, address, phone number, and birthday

  • Play independently or focus on one activity with a friend for up to ten minutes

  • Manage bathroom needs

  • Dress himself

  • Follow directions

  • Clean up after himself

  • Listen to a story without interrupting

  • Separate from parents easily 

 

Don’t panic if your child hasn’t nailed everything on the list —he or she will learn a lot in kindergarten. What’s more important is to wean your child from relying on you to do things they could do themselves, such as zipping their jacket or tying their shoes. Give them the chance to show you what they can do for themselves — you might be in for a few surprises!

 

Skills Acquired During Kindergarten

Although, curriculums may vary from school to school, general goals focus on children building strong pre-reading skills, practicing letter formation, enhancing listening and communication skills, getting an introduction to basic math concepts, and acquiring an active interest in the world. Generally speaking, your child will be expected to:

 

 

Language Arts

  • Recognize and write all of the letters of the alphabet in upper- and lowercase forms

  • Write his first and last name

  • Learn sounds corresponding to vowels and consonants

  • Use initial consonant sounds and sound patterns to read words (for example, f + an = fan; r + an = ran)

  • Orally tells what sound is heard at the beginning and ending of words

  • Blend CVC sounds aloud to make a word

  • Identify several sight words, including names of colors

  • Recognize and use rhyming words

  • Retell a story including details

  • Put events of a story in order

  • Write simple sentences using sight words and phonics skills

  • Identifies front, back, title, and author of a book

  • Demonstrate top to bottom, left to right progression

  • Distinguishes letters from words and words from sentences

  • Identifies characters, setting, and maid idea of a story

  • Prints name correctly “on line”

  • Orally state the names of the days of the week and months of the year

  • Identifies the eight basic colors and read the corresponding color words

 

Listening and Communication

  • Listen attentively

  • Raise hands or wait to speak

  • Act on instruction and repeat spoken directions

  • Engage in question-and-answer dialogue with classmates and teachers

  • Work as a team on projects or problem-solving

  • Math

  • Demonstrates 1 to 1 correspondence

  • Sorts and classifies objects by position, shape, size, color, number of corners, etc.

  • Identifies, copies, extends, and creates patterns

  • Can count to 100 by 1's, 2’s, 5’s and 10's

  • Identifies the shapes (circle, oval, square, rectangle, triangle, diamond, star, heart, shamrock, octagon, hexagon, etc.)

  • Draws the five basic shapes

  • Identifies numerals (0-100)

  • Labels sets (0-10) with correct numeral

  • Compares sets of objects and uses the terms equal, more than, or less than correctly

  • Can count backwards from 10

  • Identifies coins (penny, nickel, dime, quarter)

  • Joins and separates sets of objects

  • Tells time to the hour and half hour

  • Identifies half versus whole

  • Divides sets of objects into equal groups

  • Compares measurements and uses the terms shorter, longer, taller, heavier, warmer, cooler, holds more, etc. correctly

  • Uses positional words to explain location (left, right, on, off, inside, between, above, below, etc.)  

  • Interprets graphs

 

Science

  • Explore science tools: magnets, prisms, magnifying glasses, etc.

  • Experience the world through nature walks, gardening, and other explorations

  • Observe insect life

  • Observe plant growth

  • Observe weather and plant life during each season

  • Measure and mix ingredients in cooking activities

  • Identify basic colors and explore color mixing

  • Make observational drawings and dictation

  • Explore the world with the five senses Investigate animals, the homes they live in, the food they eat

 

Creative Arts

 

Explore a variety of art processes: painting, drawing, sculpture, weaving, collage, etc.  aUse a variety of art materials: crayons, tempera paint, watercolor paint, colored pencils, markers, oil pastels, art chalk, clay Experiment with mixing paint colors Sing traditional songs and songs that enhance the curriculum        Participate in movement songs and dancesUse scarves, rhythm sticks, and bean bags to practice rhythms Use a variety of children’s instruments Participate in dramatic play  Dramatize familiar stories Act out the movements and sounds of animals

 

Social Skills

  • Practice problem-solving skills in social situations

  • Work in groups or with a partner on a variety of projects

  • Share classroom materials with the group

  • Practice using manners: please, thank you, excuse me, table manners

  • Communicate his/her needs

  • Take care of his/her own basic needs: clean up, roll up nap pad, fasten clothing, use tissue as needed, etc.

  • State personal information: first and last name, age, school name, city, state, country Explore types of work and workers

  • Explore modes of transportation

Participate in projects to help others in need

Technology

  • Use computer programs to create picture stories

  • Use a computer mouse: click, click and drag

  • Use the Internet to explore kid-friendly websites

Character Education

  • Character Education will address skills and concepts that are important in growing up to be a good neighbor and citizen.

  • Responsibility

  • Respect

  • Fairness

  • Caring

  • Trustworthiness

  • Citizenship

 

© 2013 by Sabbathfire-Crossfire Mininstries. All rights reserved.

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